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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

First...

Thank you for your service, Bill!

Carry on!

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founding
Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

Regarding (“Of course, some were clock-watching, unmotivated lifers who sucked the life out of everything and dragged everyone else down with them.”) this quote , this has been my experience dealing with agents on audits, more often than not.

And allegedly the IRS had a well advertised job fare for more than a thousand jobs and less than 100 people showed up and when offered jobs galf of those didn’t show up…

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My philosophy is to just do the best you can do at work, then let it go. I found a career that taught me about life. Every client is a world unto themselves. Their bodies are either rebelling or struggling when they come to me. What I found is that helping clients connect to their bodies, being curious about their medical situations and learning to work as a team with their issues, helps them to live the best life they can and transform their life. After all, if you can’t get along within yourself, how can you expect to get along with anyone else? So if you see your health as a job, you’ll never find perfection, but you can find contentment, peace, and motivation one day at a time.

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I’ve personally known auditors in the business world, both internal and external, some as the entity being audited. The vast majority were just trying to follow the rules and do their jobs. I’ve never known an IRS auditor but find it difficult to imagine what their job is like.

The five lessons are a wonderful roadmap for life. You might even consider turning them into a self-help book, perhaps along the lines of “The Five Dysfunctions of a Team.”

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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

In my experience working with government employees that put process over results is that sometimes it leaves out discretion when common sense and logic apply. Then they hide behind “They’re just following the rules.” If only everything fit so neatly into political policy and procedure.

With that said, there are the exceptions who challenge the status quo when appropriate but they probably don’t last long in that career.

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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

Thank you for all you do for us Bill, every day (and later night!). I love the picture of Bayley! That made me smile!

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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

Is a lesson learned if it isn’t implemented? Or is the theory understood, but the lesson isn’t actually learned? Mostly rhetorical, but I’m not sure you can “learn” the same lesson over and over, you can be taught over and over, but it isn’t learned until it’s implemented… just a thought…

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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

Yes a lesson can be learned and not implemented. Yes a theory can be understood and not learned. That's the whole basis for the saying, hey y'all watch this! In my youth, I learned how to ride a mechanical bull. I understood the theory behind it. But Friday night, a few beers in and...hey y'all watch this, and I was off in less than a second.

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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

Bill you have to write a book about all of the jobs you've had and the most interesting, funnies, worst, situations you found yourself in at all of them. Every time you mention a job you've had in the past I go, "wow, I'd love to hear more about that". I'll tell you about the time a government worker at the DMV tried to convince me that I wasn't legally married, if you tell us something wacky about one of your experiences as a government worker.

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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

Regarding the life suckers and those counting down until retirement, here's something they don't teach you in school. Something my Dad taught me decades ago and it really changed the way I interact with those two cohorts. Not everyone can lead a parade.

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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

As a tax preparer who has slaved over returns for the past 10 weeks, why do the government workers get all the love? I'm just messin' with you, but I'm also looking forward to some well deserved time off. Many of my colleagues have mentioned how brutal this tax year has been. At first that seems odd, considering all the various stimulus payments and grants paid by the various government entities over the past two years. However, I do think this year is a consequence of the past two because many tax preparers have burned out and/or retired from the profession resulting in an influx of new clients for the rest of us. So, not complaining, but planning to hire more help earlier in the game next year.

Do any readers know anything about outsourcing oversees? Also, I need a sheepadoodle.

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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

I re-signed up with the first prompt, but I want the punchline!!!

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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

Coffee Cup

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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

I worked for a state agency for five years and came to appreciate bureaucracy and the employees there. Almost all were dedicated to their jobs, efficient, and pleasant work with. They valued the security working for the state provided. But one thing I learned was the value of bureaucracy, one of the major sources of stability in our country. No matter how much political turmoil was going on, we kept doing our jobs. Services were provided. Yes, sometimes the regulations and slowness of the processes were frustrating, but the services were still provided

If there were an attack on the

Capitol, the services would still be

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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

Good insight, to be able to glean the positive out of negative environment (I worked in city government) is a point of character that is lacking in many fields, especially in todays culture. As a old pastor once said to me about his sermons. As a horse feeds they eat the oats leave the stubble. The oats are better for you. Good advise for life. In every situation look for the good and you will find it. It is healthier for you.

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Love that Danny! “Everywhere you look, you see what you are looking for.” --Ram Dass

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Hey Bill, as a loyal “Substacker,” I’m having a hard time understanding (see what I did there?) why you are moving to a new format. You’ve shared a bit in recent past posts, and I think promised more clarification. I, for one, need to be very stingy in how I use media and so I restrict the number of different formats choosing instead to value consistency, simplicity, minimalism, and loyalty. I write on Substack myself and have LOVED everything they are offering as well as their mission to simply value writers and not advertisers. I’m hesitating in moving with you to the new format (and here I am, a paid subscriber—yours being the only Substack I pay to receive for the full benefit and to offer you support). I don’t have a Facebook page nor am I on Twitter or TikTok. You initially appealed to me because you were an early Substack adopter and your style of writing appealed greatly to me. I don’t want new “clutter” in my life and have no need to upload new apps and formats—nor do I need new solicitations from those new places. I cannot find that you have named the new format you are moving to so that someone like me could look more closely into it to see if we want to invite that into our lives. So, I’m struggling. And I’m struggling as well with these latest “rewards” if we move over by 2pm today—not that I feel entitled, but I also don’t want to feel pressured like this knowing I lose out on the rewards even if I move over with you later. What say you to all this? I’m wondering if anyone else feels this way or if I’m simply the only one?

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Apr 18, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

I was one of the 2500 original peeps to move over. Substack seemed fine to me, but I figure, if it’s important to Bill, it’s worth a try from me. If I don’t like it, I can always leave later. No harm, no foul.

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Yes, thanks Glen. I am considering this line of thinking as well. But I still haven’t hit the “switch” button yet. I think what might help would be to find out what the new format is, who created it, how it’s funded, and then make my choice. In this day and age where divisiveness rules, I don’t want to invest my mental energies in places that aren’t worthy of my presence. It’s why I’ve never had Facebook in my life—and I haven’t ever, EVER felt the poorer for that. In fact, from those I know who do have a FB page, their stress and wish to leave is all the affirmation I’ve needed to confirm my decision. Bill’s an excellent writer and I like both his style and his take on the world, to say nothing of his Dad jokes. And I’ve loved that he’s showcased other authors’ Substack writing to highlight other good writing on the format that might not be as well known. I wonder if that practice now ends? This seems to still be my way of saying how much I love Substack and my wish to stay loyal to them.

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Yup, we’re polar opposites. It’s what makes the world interesting!

You probably take weeks to research a destination and all the possibilities before taking a vacation. I have a bag packed so I can go on a moment’s notice and figure I’ll wing it when I get there.

The unsubscribe button was made for people like me. Haha

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I so appreciate you for your whimsical sense of humor. We’re probably not all that different—I like to wing it when I’m on vacation but you are correct, I need to know exactly where we’re going first. Not a fan of surprises. Huge fan of unsubscribe buttons. Thanks for the smile today! Truly.

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Hi and thanks for this. I've been planning to do a big discussion and explanation for those who are interested -- maybe on Saturday -- frankly using one of the new tools I'm picking up to make it optional, as I'm curious how many readers think or care much about what platform we use.

More than 98% of my readers and 99% of premium subscribers find me from outside Substack, but I'm grateful to those who found me here too! Anyway to answer your question, I'll be using ConvertKit for email, WordPress for website, and probably Circle.co for greater community.

I like Substack a lot. I wish them well and who knows, maybe someday we'll be back. But, there are a lot of things we can do with the tools we're going gain on the new stack to grow the community, improve the newsletter, offer better value to premium members, and run less intrusive but consistent ads. That last point is important, we we need multiple revenue sources to keep this viable!

By the way ... if you're a premium member, I've already brought you over and you'll get the newsletter uninterrupted tomorrow.

Like I say — I'll have more of an explanation later in the week. I'm just one guy behind this and it's been very complicated and took a lot of time. Thanks for your support!

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Thank you so much Bill. Yes, I’m a premium member so I do get the privilege of uninterrupted work from you. I really do love your writing. And I give you a bow of deep respect for utilizing these forums for writing in order to secure an income. That’s not easy amidst all the other choices that are out there. I hope the new forum meets your current needs.

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Apr 19, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

I too was a trial attorney for the US Dept of Labor. I started right out of law school and wanted to learn how to be a trial lawyer and the best way was to try cases. We prosecuted civil cases against large Fortune 500 companies who had the biggest and best law firms and I learned a lot by seeing how they tried cases against me. Our office was constantly being threatened with our office being closed and now 50 years later, that office is still there. I too was with the clock watchers but I wanted to try every case and the "clients" ( Dept of Labor sections) loved me since I would take every case to trial but my peers resented that the agencies wanted me. My peers just wantd to get to retirement. I left after 5 years and have become (50 yrs later) a successful trial attorney

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Bill were you with Labor in DC? My career path as a lawyer was basically DOJ Tax Division, IRS, called up in the reserves into the JAG corps. But, as I was getting of active duty I interviewed to be a trial attorney at the US Dept of Labor, I think on 3rd St NW in DC. I liked that it was a fed agency, but they still had their own attorneys try cases instead of having to farm them to DOJ. They were nice folks, too. But I wound up getting my job with Woodward at the Washington Post so I went that route instead.

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Apr 19, 2023Liked by Bill Murphy Jr.

I was in Cleveland OH office, a branch out of the Chicago region that they kept threatening to close but after 50 years it is still there. I was usually first one in the morning and last to leave. I wanted to learn. The other attorneys would gather in the lobby at 4:45 and sit and wait for 5:00 so they could leave. There were "lifers" there waiting for retirement. We were supposed to pick anc choose the cases but I filed every case that was assigned to me and the agencies loved me for it but my peers resented it. A good year was if an attorney filed 12 to 18 cases. I filed 100 my first year.

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